The Building

A former monastery of the Poor Clares

Im letzten Stockwerk und im Dachgeschoss dieses historischen Gebäudes befindet sich das Frauenmuseum in Meran seit dem Jahre 2011

Since 2011, the Women’s Museum is found on the last floor and in the attic of this historic building.

Since 2011, the Women’s Museum is found on the last floor and in the attic of this historic building.

Der Teil des Kreuzgangs des ehemaligen Frauenklosters im Parterre, der noch erhalten geblieben ist. Es enthält kostbare Fresken des Hauses und wird auch immer wieder vom Frauenmuseum bespielt

On the ground floor, part of the cloister of the former women’s monastery is still preserved until today. It contains precious frescoes and serves as an additional space for exhibitions and events of the Women’s Museum - every now and then.

On the ground floor, part of the cloister of the former women’s monastery is still preserved until today. It contains precious frescoes and serves as an additional space for exhibitions and events of the Women’s Museum - every now and then.

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2011

In 2011 the rooms of the museum were officially opened. Since then, it is the Seat of the Women’s Museum, and also of IAWM (International Association of Women’s Museums).

2010

In 2010, the two upper floors were adapted for the Women’s Museum and rented by the Municipality of Merano for the museum.

1923

In 1923 the Spar- und Vorschusskasse acquired the building. It was the predecessor of today’s Volksbank which still occupies the lower part of the building. The frescoes of the church were documented, partially removed and reapplied in the cloister.

1782

In 1782 Emperor Joseph II closed down many monasteries. The Poor Clares had to leave their religious domicile.

1309

In 1309 the Monastery of the Poor Clares was built in the Meraner Kornplatz by Archduchess Euphemia. For 500 years this foundation shaped the city of Merano. In addition to the church of St. Nikolaus, the church of the monastery was the most important sacred building in the city. The Poor Clares were also the only medieval nunnery in Merano. The monastery was the center of the devotion to Saint Mary, it was a school for young girls, hosted local brotherhoods and guilds, and was a cemetery of many local citizens and aristocrats.